nicco's diary
衣, 食, 住 In No Particular Order
nicco's diary
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enochliew:

Oliver Ranch Installation by Bruce Nauman
All the treads are exactly the same size, but every riser is different and measures the changing contours every 30 inches.
enochliew:

Oliver Ranch Installation by Bruce Nauman
All the treads are exactly the same size, but every riser is different and measures the changing contours every 30 inches.
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megazal:

All sizes | . | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
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bigmagnets:

the rodina
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worclip:

Arrow Studio (2012-2013) by PHTR Architects
Photographed by Sam Reed and Toby Reed
Location: Tylden, Victoria, Australia

A few years ago our client, Mr White, retired to Tylden in the countryside near Hanging Rock. Our brief was to build a small gallery in the back yard, facing the bush, where he could hang his late wife’s paintings. The gallery would also be used as a study/studio. For security reasons, as well as to maximize hanging space, we were asked to have minimal windows, and for those windows to be framed in a way that intruders could not break in. This became the generator of the shape, which hides the windows behind the screened areas at each end (arrow head, or rotated gables, as the builders referred to them).
The budget, not much more than an off-the-shelf garden shed with slab, was of prime importance, and could not be exceeded. All walls are plywood, which braces the structure and replaces plasterboard on the inside. The galvanised sheets overlapped diagonally form a second skin which helps insulate and protects the ply from the harsh conditions. The roof is an off-the-shelf, all-in-one insulated roofing system (incorporating roofing, insulation and ceiling).
The space between the gallery and the house (an old brick veneer) has become a protected outdoor entertaining area, while on the other side the gallery forms a backdrop for BBQs with a bush setting. At night the room acts as a giant lantern, illuminating the bush garden.
The project was an excuse to do a variation on the modern white cube so often associated with the gallery space. We were also interested in rethinking the Australian steel clad country shed.
worclip:

Arrow Studio (2012-2013) by PHTR Architects
Photographed by Sam Reed and Toby Reed
Location: Tylden, Victoria, Australia

A few years ago our client, Mr White, retired to Tylden in the countryside near Hanging Rock. Our brief was to build a small gallery in the back yard, facing the bush, where he could hang his late wife’s paintings. The gallery would also be used as a study/studio. For security reasons, as well as to maximize hanging space, we were asked to have minimal windows, and for those windows to be framed in a way that intruders could not break in. This became the generator of the shape, which hides the windows behind the screened areas at each end (arrow head, or rotated gables, as the builders referred to them).
The budget, not much more than an off-the-shelf garden shed with slab, was of prime importance, and could not be exceeded. All walls are plywood, which braces the structure and replaces plasterboard on the inside. The galvanised sheets overlapped diagonally form a second skin which helps insulate and protects the ply from the harsh conditions. The roof is an off-the-shelf, all-in-one insulated roofing system (incorporating roofing, insulation and ceiling).
The space between the gallery and the house (an old brick veneer) has become a protected outdoor entertaining area, while on the other side the gallery forms a backdrop for BBQs with a bush setting. At night the room acts as a giant lantern, illuminating the bush garden.
The project was an excuse to do a variation on the modern white cube so often associated with the gallery space. We were also interested in rethinking the Australian steel clad country shed.
worclip:

Arrow Studio (2012-2013) by PHTR Architects
Photographed by Sam Reed and Toby Reed
Location: Tylden, Victoria, Australia

A few years ago our client, Mr White, retired to Tylden in the countryside near Hanging Rock. Our brief was to build a small gallery in the back yard, facing the bush, where he could hang his late wife’s paintings. The gallery would also be used as a study/studio. For security reasons, as well as to maximize hanging space, we were asked to have minimal windows, and for those windows to be framed in a way that intruders could not break in. This became the generator of the shape, which hides the windows behind the screened areas at each end (arrow head, or rotated gables, as the builders referred to them).
The budget, not much more than an off-the-shelf garden shed with slab, was of prime importance, and could not be exceeded. All walls are plywood, which braces the structure and replaces plasterboard on the inside. The galvanised sheets overlapped diagonally form a second skin which helps insulate and protects the ply from the harsh conditions. The roof is an off-the-shelf, all-in-one insulated roofing system (incorporating roofing, insulation and ceiling).
The space between the gallery and the house (an old brick veneer) has become a protected outdoor entertaining area, while on the other side the gallery forms a backdrop for BBQs with a bush setting. At night the room acts as a giant lantern, illuminating the bush garden.
The project was an excuse to do a variation on the modern white cube so often associated with the gallery space. We were also interested in rethinking the Australian steel clad country shed.
worclip:

Arrow Studio (2012-2013) by PHTR Architects
Photographed by Sam Reed and Toby Reed
Location: Tylden, Victoria, Australia

A few years ago our client, Mr White, retired to Tylden in the countryside near Hanging Rock. Our brief was to build a small gallery in the back yard, facing the bush, where he could hang his late wife’s paintings. The gallery would also be used as a study/studio. For security reasons, as well as to maximize hanging space, we were asked to have minimal windows, and for those windows to be framed in a way that intruders could not break in. This became the generator of the shape, which hides the windows behind the screened areas at each end (arrow head, or rotated gables, as the builders referred to them).
The budget, not much more than an off-the-shelf garden shed with slab, was of prime importance, and could not be exceeded. All walls are plywood, which braces the structure and replaces plasterboard on the inside. The galvanised sheets overlapped diagonally form a second skin which helps insulate and protects the ply from the harsh conditions. The roof is an off-the-shelf, all-in-one insulated roofing system (incorporating roofing, insulation and ceiling).
The space between the gallery and the house (an old brick veneer) has become a protected outdoor entertaining area, while on the other side the gallery forms a backdrop for BBQs with a bush setting. At night the room acts as a giant lantern, illuminating the bush garden.
The project was an excuse to do a variation on the modern white cube so often associated with the gallery space. We were also interested in rethinking the Australian steel clad country shed.
worclip:

Arrow Studio (2012-2013) by PHTR Architects
Photographed by Sam Reed and Toby Reed
Location: Tylden, Victoria, Australia

A few years ago our client, Mr White, retired to Tylden in the countryside near Hanging Rock. Our brief was to build a small gallery in the back yard, facing the bush, where he could hang his late wife’s paintings. The gallery would also be used as a study/studio. For security reasons, as well as to maximize hanging space, we were asked to have minimal windows, and for those windows to be framed in a way that intruders could not break in. This became the generator of the shape, which hides the windows behind the screened areas at each end (arrow head, or rotated gables, as the builders referred to them).
The budget, not much more than an off-the-shelf garden shed with slab, was of prime importance, and could not be exceeded. All walls are plywood, which braces the structure and replaces plasterboard on the inside. The galvanised sheets overlapped diagonally form a second skin which helps insulate and protects the ply from the harsh conditions. The roof is an off-the-shelf, all-in-one insulated roofing system (incorporating roofing, insulation and ceiling).
The space between the gallery and the house (an old brick veneer) has become a protected outdoor entertaining area, while on the other side the gallery forms a backdrop for BBQs with a bush setting. At night the room acts as a giant lantern, illuminating the bush garden.
The project was an excuse to do a variation on the modern white cube so often associated with the gallery space. We were also interested in rethinking the Australian steel clad country shed.
worclip:

Arrow Studio (2012-2013) by PHTR Architects
Photographed by Sam Reed and Toby Reed
Location: Tylden, Victoria, Australia

A few years ago our client, Mr White, retired to Tylden in the countryside near Hanging Rock. Our brief was to build a small gallery in the back yard, facing the bush, where he could hang his late wife’s paintings. The gallery would also be used as a study/studio. For security reasons, as well as to maximize hanging space, we were asked to have minimal windows, and for those windows to be framed in a way that intruders could not break in. This became the generator of the shape, which hides the windows behind the screened areas at each end (arrow head, or rotated gables, as the builders referred to them).
The budget, not much more than an off-the-shelf garden shed with slab, was of prime importance, and could not be exceeded. All walls are plywood, which braces the structure and replaces plasterboard on the inside. The galvanised sheets overlapped diagonally form a second skin which helps insulate and protects the ply from the harsh conditions. The roof is an off-the-shelf, all-in-one insulated roofing system (incorporating roofing, insulation and ceiling).
The space between the gallery and the house (an old brick veneer) has become a protected outdoor entertaining area, while on the other side the gallery forms a backdrop for BBQs with a bush setting. At night the room acts as a giant lantern, illuminating the bush garden.
The project was an excuse to do a variation on the modern white cube so often associated with the gallery space. We were also interested in rethinking the Australian steel clad country shed.
worclip:

Arrow Studio (2012-2013) by PHTR Architects
Photographed by Sam Reed and Toby Reed
Location: Tylden, Victoria, Australia

A few years ago our client, Mr White, retired to Tylden in the countryside near Hanging Rock. Our brief was to build a small gallery in the back yard, facing the bush, where he could hang his late wife’s paintings. The gallery would also be used as a study/studio. For security reasons, as well as to maximize hanging space, we were asked to have minimal windows, and for those windows to be framed in a way that intruders could not break in. This became the generator of the shape, which hides the windows behind the screened areas at each end (arrow head, or rotated gables, as the builders referred to them).
The budget, not much more than an off-the-shelf garden shed with slab, was of prime importance, and could not be exceeded. All walls are plywood, which braces the structure and replaces plasterboard on the inside. The galvanised sheets overlapped diagonally form a second skin which helps insulate and protects the ply from the harsh conditions. The roof is an off-the-shelf, all-in-one insulated roofing system (incorporating roofing, insulation and ceiling).
The space between the gallery and the house (an old brick veneer) has become a protected outdoor entertaining area, while on the other side the gallery forms a backdrop for BBQs with a bush setting. At night the room acts as a giant lantern, illuminating the bush garden.
The project was an excuse to do a variation on the modern white cube so often associated with the gallery space. We were also interested in rethinking the Australian steel clad country shed.
worclip:

Arrow Studio (2012-2013) by PHTR Architects
Photographed by Sam Reed and Toby Reed
Location: Tylden, Victoria, Australia

A few years ago our client, Mr White, retired to Tylden in the countryside near Hanging Rock. Our brief was to build a small gallery in the back yard, facing the bush, where he could hang his late wife’s paintings. The gallery would also be used as a study/studio. For security reasons, as well as to maximize hanging space, we were asked to have minimal windows, and for those windows to be framed in a way that intruders could not break in. This became the generator of the shape, which hides the windows behind the screened areas at each end (arrow head, or rotated gables, as the builders referred to them).
The budget, not much more than an off-the-shelf garden shed with slab, was of prime importance, and could not be exceeded. All walls are plywood, which braces the structure and replaces plasterboard on the inside. The galvanised sheets overlapped diagonally form a second skin which helps insulate and protects the ply from the harsh conditions. The roof is an off-the-shelf, all-in-one insulated roofing system (incorporating roofing, insulation and ceiling).
The space between the gallery and the house (an old brick veneer) has become a protected outdoor entertaining area, while on the other side the gallery forms a backdrop for BBQs with a bush setting. At night the room acts as a giant lantern, illuminating the bush garden.
The project was an excuse to do a variation on the modern white cube so often associated with the gallery space. We were also interested in rethinking the Australian steel clad country shed.
worclip:

Arrow Studio (2012-2013) by PHTR Architects
Photographed by Sam Reed and Toby Reed
Location: Tylden, Victoria, Australia

A few years ago our client, Mr White, retired to Tylden in the countryside near Hanging Rock. Our brief was to build a small gallery in the back yard, facing the bush, where he could hang his late wife’s paintings. The gallery would also be used as a study/studio. For security reasons, as well as to maximize hanging space, we were asked to have minimal windows, and for those windows to be framed in a way that intruders could not break in. This became the generator of the shape, which hides the windows behind the screened areas at each end (arrow head, or rotated gables, as the builders referred to them).
The budget, not much more than an off-the-shelf garden shed with slab, was of prime importance, and could not be exceeded. All walls are plywood, which braces the structure and replaces plasterboard on the inside. The galvanised sheets overlapped diagonally form a second skin which helps insulate and protects the ply from the harsh conditions. The roof is an off-the-shelf, all-in-one insulated roofing system (incorporating roofing, insulation and ceiling).
The space between the gallery and the house (an old brick veneer) has become a protected outdoor entertaining area, while on the other side the gallery forms a backdrop for BBQs with a bush setting. At night the room acts as a giant lantern, illuminating the bush garden.
The project was an excuse to do a variation on the modern white cube so often associated with the gallery space. We were also interested in rethinking the Australian steel clad country shed.
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megazal:

Beauty Within, Beauty Without (via Rekishi no Tabi)
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typohan:

Track 9 - 이소라  poster
© joonghyun cho
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bigmagnets:

kambiz shafei
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darksilenceinsuburbia:

Ed Spence

Tumblr Instagram
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Ed Spence

Tumblr Instagram
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Ed Spence

Tumblr Instagram
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Ed Spence

Tumblr Instagram
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Ed Spence

Tumblr Instagram
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Ed Spence

Tumblr Instagram
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Ed Spence

Tumblr Instagram
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Ed Spence

Tumblr Instagram
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subtilitas:

Barclay & Crousse - M6 house, Lima 2013. Photos (C) Cristobal Palma. 
subtilitas:

Barclay & Crousse - M6 house, Lima 2013. Photos (C) Cristobal Palma. 
subtilitas:

Barclay & Crousse - M6 house, Lima 2013. Photos (C) Cristobal Palma. 
subtilitas:

Barclay & Crousse - M6 house, Lima 2013. Photos (C) Cristobal Palma. 
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3.1 Phillip Lim FW2014

3.1 Phillip Lim FW2014
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Ann Lislegaard, Nothing but Space, 1997
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nickkahler:

James Turrell, Roden Crater, Flagstaff, AZ, 1979-Present (via archdaily)
nickkahler:

James Turrell, Roden Crater, Flagstaff, AZ, 1979-Present (via archdaily)
nickkahler:

James Turrell, Roden Crater, Flagstaff, AZ, 1979-Present (via archdaily)
nickkahler:

James Turrell, Roden Crater, Flagstaff, AZ, 1979-Present (via archdaily)
nickkahler:

James Turrell, Roden Crater, Flagstaff, AZ, 1979-Present (via archdaily)
nickkahler:

James Turrell, Roden Crater, Flagstaff, AZ, 1979-Present (via archdaily)
nickkahler:

James Turrell, Roden Crater, Flagstaff, AZ, 1979-Present (via archdaily)
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nervoservo:

  Richard Hamilton 

Structure, 1950.
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7knotwind:

untitled drawing experiment 2014(a drawing made by the touch of others)kevin townsend72 pages (11” x 17”) were each buffed  for 1 hour with graphite and bare hands, folded and stacked. (as seen here)
18 participants are given white cotton gloves and are allowed to touch, handle and engage the pages in any way they desire with the instruction that they are to return the pages to the stack and pile the gloves on the floor when they are done.
The resulting drawing is made on the gloves and is a record of the participants’ touch
The stacked pages are bundled (as they were left) with cotton twine 
7knotwind:

untitled drawing experiment 2014(a drawing made by the touch of others)kevin townsend72 pages (11” x 17”) were each buffed  for 1 hour with graphite and bare hands, folded and stacked. (as seen here)
18 participants are given white cotton gloves and are allowed to touch, handle and engage the pages in any way they desire with the instruction that they are to return the pages to the stack and pile the gloves on the floor when they are done.
The resulting drawing is made on the gloves and is a record of the participants’ touch
The stacked pages are bundled (as they were left) with cotton twine 
7knotwind:

untitled drawing experiment 2014(a drawing made by the touch of others)kevin townsend72 pages (11” x 17”) were each buffed  for 1 hour with graphite and bare hands, folded and stacked. (as seen here)
18 participants are given white cotton gloves and are allowed to touch, handle and engage the pages in any way they desire with the instruction that they are to return the pages to the stack and pile the gloves on the floor when they are done.
The resulting drawing is made on the gloves and is a record of the participants’ touch
The stacked pages are bundled (as they were left) with cotton twine 
7knotwind:

untitled drawing experiment 2014(a drawing made by the touch of others)kevin townsend72 pages (11” x 17”) were each buffed  for 1 hour with graphite and bare hands, folded and stacked. (as seen here)
18 participants are given white cotton gloves and are allowed to touch, handle and engage the pages in any way they desire with the instruction that they are to return the pages to the stack and pile the gloves on the floor when they are done.
The resulting drawing is made on the gloves and is a record of the participants’ touch
The stacked pages are bundled (as they were left) with cotton twine 
7knotwind:

untitled drawing experiment 2014(a drawing made by the touch of others)kevin townsend72 pages (11” x 17”) were each buffed  for 1 hour with graphite and bare hands, folded and stacked. (as seen here)
18 participants are given white cotton gloves and are allowed to touch, handle and engage the pages in any way they desire with the instruction that they are to return the pages to the stack and pile the gloves on the floor when they are done.
The resulting drawing is made on the gloves and is a record of the participants’ touch
The stacked pages are bundled (as they were left) with cotton twine 
7knotwind:

untitled drawing experiment 2014(a drawing made by the touch of others)kevin townsend72 pages (11” x 17”) were each buffed  for 1 hour with graphite and bare hands, folded and stacked. (as seen here)
18 participants are given white cotton gloves and are allowed to touch, handle and engage the pages in any way they desire with the instruction that they are to return the pages to the stack and pile the gloves on the floor when they are done.
The resulting drawing is made on the gloves and is a record of the participants’ touch
The stacked pages are bundled (as they were left) with cotton twine 
7knotwind:

untitled drawing experiment 2014(a drawing made by the touch of others)kevin townsend72 pages (11” x 17”) were each buffed  for 1 hour with graphite and bare hands, folded and stacked. (as seen here)
18 participants are given white cotton gloves and are allowed to touch, handle and engage the pages in any way they desire with the instruction that they are to return the pages to the stack and pile the gloves on the floor when they are done.
The resulting drawing is made on the gloves and is a record of the participants’ touch
The stacked pages are bundled (as they were left) with cotton twine 
7knotwind:

untitled drawing experiment 2014(a drawing made by the touch of others)kevin townsend72 pages (11” x 17”) were each buffed  for 1 hour with graphite and bare hands, folded and stacked. (as seen here)
18 participants are given white cotton gloves and are allowed to touch, handle and engage the pages in any way they desire with the instruction that they are to return the pages to the stack and pile the gloves on the floor when they are done.
The resulting drawing is made on the gloves and is a record of the participants’ touch
The stacked pages are bundled (as they were left) with cotton twine