nicco's diary
衣, 食, 住 In No Particular Order
nicco's diary
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fiore-rosso:

dave spertine | adistraction.
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2headedsnake:

Yasuaki Onishi
hot glue art
2headedsnake:

Yasuaki Onishi
hot glue art
2headedsnake:

Yasuaki Onishi
hot glue art
2headedsnake:

Yasuaki Onishi
hot glue art
2headedsnake:

Yasuaki Onishi
hot glue art
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megazal:

Buamai - Frozen City | The New Yorker
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Architecture Photography: ARC / BERNASKONI (492941)
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victortsu:

Superstudio. Microevent-Microenvironment, 1972.
(via ANTI-VITRUV & SUPER-BRUNELLESCHI)
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hysysk:

Sans Form - Minimalissimo
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fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  
fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  
fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  
fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  
fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  
fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  
fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  
fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  
fabriciomora:

How Did Famous Creative People Spend Their Days?
Creative Routines by RJ Andrews  
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gasoline-station:

Sacral Contemplation
Ian Davis, Socks Studio
New-York based artist Ian Davis paints scenes where human beings are reduced to minimal multiplied figures gathering around a monumental presence. The main focus of a sacral contemplation by the anonymous crowd is sometimes a technological artifact, sometimes an infrastructure or a building . It’s the dramatic depiction of a world where man-made artifacts overcome the society of people who produced them, painted in an ironic, almost cartoon-like style.
 
gasoline-station:

Sacral Contemplation
Ian Davis, Socks Studio
New-York based artist Ian Davis paints scenes where human beings are reduced to minimal multiplied figures gathering around a monumental presence. The main focus of a sacral contemplation by the anonymous crowd is sometimes a technological artifact, sometimes an infrastructure or a building . It’s the dramatic depiction of a world where man-made artifacts overcome the society of people who produced them, painted in an ironic, almost cartoon-like style.
 
gasoline-station:

Sacral Contemplation
Ian Davis, Socks Studio
New-York based artist Ian Davis paints scenes where human beings are reduced to minimal multiplied figures gathering around a monumental presence. The main focus of a sacral contemplation by the anonymous crowd is sometimes a technological artifact, sometimes an infrastructure or a building . It’s the dramatic depiction of a world where man-made artifacts overcome the society of people who produced them, painted in an ironic, almost cartoon-like style.
 
gasoline-station:

Sacral Contemplation
Ian Davis, Socks Studio
New-York based artist Ian Davis paints scenes where human beings are reduced to minimal multiplied figures gathering around a monumental presence. The main focus of a sacral contemplation by the anonymous crowd is sometimes a technological artifact, sometimes an infrastructure or a building . It’s the dramatic depiction of a world where man-made artifacts overcome the society of people who produced them, painted in an ironic, almost cartoon-like style.
 
gasoline-station:

Sacral Contemplation
Ian Davis, Socks Studio
New-York based artist Ian Davis paints scenes where human beings are reduced to minimal multiplied figures gathering around a monumental presence. The main focus of a sacral contemplation by the anonymous crowd is sometimes a technological artifact, sometimes an infrastructure or a building . It’s the dramatic depiction of a world where man-made artifacts overcome the society of people who produced them, painted in an ironic, almost cartoon-like style.
 
gasoline-station:

Sacral Contemplation
Ian Davis, Socks Studio
New-York based artist Ian Davis paints scenes where human beings are reduced to minimal multiplied figures gathering around a monumental presence. The main focus of a sacral contemplation by the anonymous crowd is sometimes a technological artifact, sometimes an infrastructure or a building . It’s the dramatic depiction of a world where man-made artifacts overcome the society of people who produced them, painted in an ironic, almost cartoon-like style.
 
gasoline-station:

Sacral Contemplation
Ian Davis, Socks Studio
New-York based artist Ian Davis paints scenes where human beings are reduced to minimal multiplied figures gathering around a monumental presence. The main focus of a sacral contemplation by the anonymous crowd is sometimes a technological artifact, sometimes an infrastructure or a building . It’s the dramatic depiction of a world where man-made artifacts overcome the society of people who produced them, painted in an ironic, almost cartoon-like style.
 
gasoline-station:

Sacral Contemplation
Ian Davis, Socks Studio
New-York based artist Ian Davis paints scenes where human beings are reduced to minimal multiplied figures gathering around a monumental presence. The main focus of a sacral contemplation by the anonymous crowd is sometimes a technological artifact, sometimes an infrastructure or a building . It’s the dramatic depiction of a world where man-made artifacts overcome the society of people who produced them, painted in an ironic, almost cartoon-like style.
 
gasoline-station:

Sacral Contemplation
Ian Davis, Socks Studio
New-York based artist Ian Davis paints scenes where human beings are reduced to minimal multiplied figures gathering around a monumental presence. The main focus of a sacral contemplation by the anonymous crowd is sometimes a technological artifact, sometimes an infrastructure or a building . It’s the dramatic depiction of a world where man-made artifacts overcome the society of people who produced them, painted in an ironic, almost cartoon-like style.
 
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enochliew:

Manuela is Getting Late by Víctor Enrich
The shadows from the neighbouring building is done well, however the reflection on top of the blue car was missed.
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Inhabiting Infrastructures: Indian Stepwells | Socks Studio
The stepwells are generally storage and irrigation tanks in which sets of steps must be descended in order to reach for water and maintain the well itself. These structures are mostly common in western India and in arid regions of South Asia where they provide regular supply in regions affected by heavy seasonal fluctuations in water availability.
The stepwells, (the erliest date to 600 AD), essentially appear as infrastructural monuments for water collection, huge artifacts somewhere between landscape and architecture sunken in the earth. They are usually composed of two constant elements, a well and an access route: the well collects monsoon rain percolating through layers of fine silt (to filter particulates), eventually reaching a layer of impermeable clay. The second elements, the staircases, are descended to reach water and allow the use of the infrastructure. There are no two identical stepwells, as each one of them, – about 3000 were built -, reveals specific features in the shape and in the decorative motives; in some cases the stepwells host galleries and chambers around the well.
via ryanpanos:

Inhabiting Infrastructures: Indian Stepwells | Socks Studio
The stepwells are generally storage and irrigation tanks in which sets of steps must be descended in order to reach for water and maintain the well itself. These structures are mostly common in western India and in arid regions of South Asia where they provide regular supply in regions affected by heavy seasonal fluctuations in water availability.
The stepwells, (the erliest date to 600 AD), essentially appear as infrastructural monuments for water collection, huge artifacts somewhere between landscape and architecture sunken in the earth. They are usually composed of two constant elements, a well and an access route: the well collects monsoon rain percolating through layers of fine silt (to filter particulates), eventually reaching a layer of impermeable clay. The second elements, the staircases, are descended to reach water and allow the use of the infrastructure. There are no two identical stepwells, as each one of them, – about 3000 were built -, reveals specific features in the shape and in the decorative motives; in some cases the stepwells host galleries and chambers around the well.
via ryanpanos:

Inhabiting Infrastructures: Indian Stepwells | Socks Studio
The stepwells are generally storage and irrigation tanks in which sets of steps must be descended in order to reach for water and maintain the well itself. These structures are mostly common in western India and in arid regions of South Asia where they provide regular supply in regions affected by heavy seasonal fluctuations in water availability.
The stepwells, (the erliest date to 600 AD), essentially appear as infrastructural monuments for water collection, huge artifacts somewhere between landscape and architecture sunken in the earth. They are usually composed of two constant elements, a well and an access route: the well collects monsoon rain percolating through layers of fine silt (to filter particulates), eventually reaching a layer of impermeable clay. The second elements, the staircases, are descended to reach water and allow the use of the infrastructure. There are no two identical stepwells, as each one of them, – about 3000 were built -, reveals specific features in the shape and in the decorative motives; in some cases the stepwells host galleries and chambers around the well.
via ryanpanos:

Inhabiting Infrastructures: Indian Stepwells | Socks Studio
The stepwells are generally storage and irrigation tanks in which sets of steps must be descended in order to reach for water and maintain the well itself. These structures are mostly common in western India and in arid regions of South Asia where they provide regular supply in regions affected by heavy seasonal fluctuations in water availability.
The stepwells, (the erliest date to 600 AD), essentially appear as infrastructural monuments for water collection, huge artifacts somewhere between landscape and architecture sunken in the earth. They are usually composed of two constant elements, a well and an access route: the well collects monsoon rain percolating through layers of fine silt (to filter particulates), eventually reaching a layer of impermeable clay. The second elements, the staircases, are descended to reach water and allow the use of the infrastructure. There are no two identical stepwells, as each one of them, – about 3000 were built -, reveals specific features in the shape and in the decorative motives; in some cases the stepwells host galleries and chambers around the well.
via ryanpanos:

Inhabiting Infrastructures: Indian Stepwells | Socks Studio
The stepwells are generally storage and irrigation tanks in which sets of steps must be descended in order to reach for water and maintain the well itself. These structures are mostly common in western India and in arid regions of South Asia where they provide regular supply in regions affected by heavy seasonal fluctuations in water availability.
The stepwells, (the erliest date to 600 AD), essentially appear as infrastructural monuments for water collection, huge artifacts somewhere between landscape and architecture sunken in the earth. They are usually composed of two constant elements, a well and an access route: the well collects monsoon rain percolating through layers of fine silt (to filter particulates), eventually reaching a layer of impermeable clay. The second elements, the staircases, are descended to reach water and allow the use of the infrastructure. There are no two identical stepwells, as each one of them, – about 3000 were built -, reveals specific features in the shape and in the decorative motives; in some cases the stepwells host galleries and chambers around the well.
via ryanpanos:

Inhabiting Infrastructures: Indian Stepwells | Socks Studio
The stepwells are generally storage and irrigation tanks in which sets of steps must be descended in order to reach for water and maintain the well itself. These structures are mostly common in western India and in arid regions of South Asia where they provide regular supply in regions affected by heavy seasonal fluctuations in water availability.
The stepwells, (the erliest date to 600 AD), essentially appear as infrastructural monuments for water collection, huge artifacts somewhere between landscape and architecture sunken in the earth. They are usually composed of two constant elements, a well and an access route: the well collects monsoon rain percolating through layers of fine silt (to filter particulates), eventually reaching a layer of impermeable clay. The second elements, the staircases, are descended to reach water and allow the use of the infrastructure. There are no two identical stepwells, as each one of them, – about 3000 were built -, reveals specific features in the shape and in the decorative motives; in some cases the stepwells host galleries and chambers around the well.
via ryanpanos:

Inhabiting Infrastructures: Indian Stepwells | Socks Studio
The stepwells are generally storage and irrigation tanks in which sets of steps must be descended in order to reach for water and maintain the well itself. These structures are mostly common in western India and in arid regions of South Asia where they provide regular supply in regions affected by heavy seasonal fluctuations in water availability.
The stepwells, (the erliest date to 600 AD), essentially appear as infrastructural monuments for water collection, huge artifacts somewhere between landscape and architecture sunken in the earth. They are usually composed of two constant elements, a well and an access route: the well collects monsoon rain percolating through layers of fine silt (to filter particulates), eventually reaching a layer of impermeable clay. The second elements, the staircases, are descended to reach water and allow the use of the infrastructure. There are no two identical stepwells, as each one of them, – about 3000 were built -, reveals specific features in the shape and in the decorative motives; in some cases the stepwells host galleries and chambers around the well.
via ryanpanos: