nicco's diary
衣, 食, 住 In No Particular Order
nicco's diary
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3.1 Phillip Lim FW2014

3.1 Phillip Lim FW2014
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Ann Lislegaard, Nothing but Space, 1997
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nickkahler:

James Turrell, Roden Crater, Flagstaff, AZ, 1979-Present (via archdaily)
nickkahler:

James Turrell, Roden Crater, Flagstaff, AZ, 1979-Present (via archdaily)
nickkahler:

James Turrell, Roden Crater, Flagstaff, AZ, 1979-Present (via archdaily)
nickkahler:

James Turrell, Roden Crater, Flagstaff, AZ, 1979-Present (via archdaily)
nickkahler:

James Turrell, Roden Crater, Flagstaff, AZ, 1979-Present (via archdaily)
nickkahler:

James Turrell, Roden Crater, Flagstaff, AZ, 1979-Present (via archdaily)
nickkahler:

James Turrell, Roden Crater, Flagstaff, AZ, 1979-Present (via archdaily)
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nervoservo:

  Richard Hamilton 

Structure, 1950.
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7knotwind:

untitled drawing experiment 2014(a drawing made by the touch of others)kevin townsend72 pages (11” x 17”) were each buffed  for 1 hour with graphite and bare hands, folded and stacked. (as seen here)
18 participants are given white cotton gloves and are allowed to touch, handle and engage the pages in any way they desire with the instruction that they are to return the pages to the stack and pile the gloves on the floor when they are done.
The resulting drawing is made on the gloves and is a record of the participants’ touch
The stacked pages are bundled (as they were left) with cotton twine 
7knotwind:

untitled drawing experiment 2014(a drawing made by the touch of others)kevin townsend72 pages (11” x 17”) were each buffed  for 1 hour with graphite and bare hands, folded and stacked. (as seen here)
18 participants are given white cotton gloves and are allowed to touch, handle and engage the pages in any way they desire with the instruction that they are to return the pages to the stack and pile the gloves on the floor when they are done.
The resulting drawing is made on the gloves and is a record of the participants’ touch
The stacked pages are bundled (as they were left) with cotton twine 
7knotwind:

untitled drawing experiment 2014(a drawing made by the touch of others)kevin townsend72 pages (11” x 17”) were each buffed  for 1 hour with graphite and bare hands, folded and stacked. (as seen here)
18 participants are given white cotton gloves and are allowed to touch, handle and engage the pages in any way they desire with the instruction that they are to return the pages to the stack and pile the gloves on the floor when they are done.
The resulting drawing is made on the gloves and is a record of the participants’ touch
The stacked pages are bundled (as they were left) with cotton twine 
7knotwind:

untitled drawing experiment 2014(a drawing made by the touch of others)kevin townsend72 pages (11” x 17”) were each buffed  for 1 hour with graphite and bare hands, folded and stacked. (as seen here)
18 participants are given white cotton gloves and are allowed to touch, handle and engage the pages in any way they desire with the instruction that they are to return the pages to the stack and pile the gloves on the floor when they are done.
The resulting drawing is made on the gloves and is a record of the participants’ touch
The stacked pages are bundled (as they were left) with cotton twine 
7knotwind:

untitled drawing experiment 2014(a drawing made by the touch of others)kevin townsend72 pages (11” x 17”) were each buffed  for 1 hour with graphite and bare hands, folded and stacked. (as seen here)
18 participants are given white cotton gloves and are allowed to touch, handle and engage the pages in any way they desire with the instruction that they are to return the pages to the stack and pile the gloves on the floor when they are done.
The resulting drawing is made on the gloves and is a record of the participants’ touch
The stacked pages are bundled (as they were left) with cotton twine 
7knotwind:

untitled drawing experiment 2014(a drawing made by the touch of others)kevin townsend72 pages (11” x 17”) were each buffed  for 1 hour with graphite and bare hands, folded and stacked. (as seen here)
18 participants are given white cotton gloves and are allowed to touch, handle and engage the pages in any way they desire with the instruction that they are to return the pages to the stack and pile the gloves on the floor when they are done.
The resulting drawing is made on the gloves and is a record of the participants’ touch
The stacked pages are bundled (as they were left) with cotton twine 
7knotwind:

untitled drawing experiment 2014(a drawing made by the touch of others)kevin townsend72 pages (11” x 17”) were each buffed  for 1 hour with graphite and bare hands, folded and stacked. (as seen here)
18 participants are given white cotton gloves and are allowed to touch, handle and engage the pages in any way they desire with the instruction that they are to return the pages to the stack and pile the gloves on the floor when they are done.
The resulting drawing is made on the gloves and is a record of the participants’ touch
The stacked pages are bundled (as they were left) with cotton twine 
7knotwind:

untitled drawing experiment 2014(a drawing made by the touch of others)kevin townsend72 pages (11” x 17”) were each buffed  for 1 hour with graphite and bare hands, folded and stacked. (as seen here)
18 participants are given white cotton gloves and are allowed to touch, handle and engage the pages in any way they desire with the instruction that they are to return the pages to the stack and pile the gloves on the floor when they are done.
The resulting drawing is made on the gloves and is a record of the participants’ touch
The stacked pages are bundled (as they were left) with cotton twine 
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ancientart:

The Bhaja Caves of Maharashtra, India.
Bhaja contains about 29 rock-cut caves, which date back to the 2nd century BCE, and is described by the Archaeological Survey of India to be “one of the important Buddhist centres of Hinayana faith in Maharashtra.” 
A prominent features of Bhaja is Cave 12, a chaitya-griha, pictured in the final photo, which is considered one of the earliest of its kind. The stupa at the back of the large apsidal hall was used for worship. Cave 20 contains a group of stupas, which were built in memory of deceased monks, and probably once contained their relics.
Cave 18 was a monastery, and its verandah contains two famous sculpted reliefs. One of these (pictured in the 2nd photo) is located to the left of the door. This artwork depicts a person riding an elephant (thought by some to be Indra) who carries an ankusa (elephant goad), with attendants aside the figure, carrying a banner. The second relief shows a royal personage aside two women. The royal figure (who some identify as Sun god Surya), rides a chariot driven by four horses, and appears to be trampling a demon-like figure.
Photos courtesy of & taken by Himanshu Sarpotdar. The write-up of the site done by the Archaeological Survey of India was of great reference to me when writing this post.
ancientart:

The Bhaja Caves of Maharashtra, India.
Bhaja contains about 29 rock-cut caves, which date back to the 2nd century BCE, and is described by the Archaeological Survey of India to be “one of the important Buddhist centres of Hinayana faith in Maharashtra.” 
A prominent features of Bhaja is Cave 12, a chaitya-griha, pictured in the final photo, which is considered one of the earliest of its kind. The stupa at the back of the large apsidal hall was used for worship. Cave 20 contains a group of stupas, which were built in memory of deceased monks, and probably once contained their relics.
Cave 18 was a monastery, and its verandah contains two famous sculpted reliefs. One of these (pictured in the 2nd photo) is located to the left of the door. This artwork depicts a person riding an elephant (thought by some to be Indra) who carries an ankusa (elephant goad), with attendants aside the figure, carrying a banner. The second relief shows a royal personage aside two women. The royal figure (who some identify as Sun god Surya), rides a chariot driven by four horses, and appears to be trampling a demon-like figure.
Photos courtesy of & taken by Himanshu Sarpotdar. The write-up of the site done by the Archaeological Survey of India was of great reference to me when writing this post.
ancientart:

The Bhaja Caves of Maharashtra, India.
Bhaja contains about 29 rock-cut caves, which date back to the 2nd century BCE, and is described by the Archaeological Survey of India to be “one of the important Buddhist centres of Hinayana faith in Maharashtra.” 
A prominent features of Bhaja is Cave 12, a chaitya-griha, pictured in the final photo, which is considered one of the earliest of its kind. The stupa at the back of the large apsidal hall was used for worship. Cave 20 contains a group of stupas, which were built in memory of deceased monks, and probably once contained their relics.
Cave 18 was a monastery, and its verandah contains two famous sculpted reliefs. One of these (pictured in the 2nd photo) is located to the left of the door. This artwork depicts a person riding an elephant (thought by some to be Indra) who carries an ankusa (elephant goad), with attendants aside the figure, carrying a banner. The second relief shows a royal personage aside two women. The royal figure (who some identify as Sun god Surya), rides a chariot driven by four horses, and appears to be trampling a demon-like figure.
Photos courtesy of & taken by Himanshu Sarpotdar. The write-up of the site done by the Archaeological Survey of India was of great reference to me when writing this post.
ancientart:

The Bhaja Caves of Maharashtra, India.
Bhaja contains about 29 rock-cut caves, which date back to the 2nd century BCE, and is described by the Archaeological Survey of India to be “one of the important Buddhist centres of Hinayana faith in Maharashtra.” 
A prominent features of Bhaja is Cave 12, a chaitya-griha, pictured in the final photo, which is considered one of the earliest of its kind. The stupa at the back of the large apsidal hall was used for worship. Cave 20 contains a group of stupas, which were built in memory of deceased monks, and probably once contained their relics.
Cave 18 was a monastery, and its verandah contains two famous sculpted reliefs. One of these (pictured in the 2nd photo) is located to the left of the door. This artwork depicts a person riding an elephant (thought by some to be Indra) who carries an ankusa (elephant goad), with attendants aside the figure, carrying a banner. The second relief shows a royal personage aside two women. The royal figure (who some identify as Sun god Surya), rides a chariot driven by four horses, and appears to be trampling a demon-like figure.
Photos courtesy of & taken by Himanshu Sarpotdar. The write-up of the site done by the Archaeological Survey of India was of great reference to me when writing this post.
ancientart:

The Bhaja Caves of Maharashtra, India.
Bhaja contains about 29 rock-cut caves, which date back to the 2nd century BCE, and is described by the Archaeological Survey of India to be “one of the important Buddhist centres of Hinayana faith in Maharashtra.” 
A prominent features of Bhaja is Cave 12, a chaitya-griha, pictured in the final photo, which is considered one of the earliest of its kind. The stupa at the back of the large apsidal hall was used for worship. Cave 20 contains a group of stupas, which were built in memory of deceased monks, and probably once contained their relics.
Cave 18 was a monastery, and its verandah contains two famous sculpted reliefs. One of these (pictured in the 2nd photo) is located to the left of the door. This artwork depicts a person riding an elephant (thought by some to be Indra) who carries an ankusa (elephant goad), with attendants aside the figure, carrying a banner. The second relief shows a royal personage aside two women. The royal figure (who some identify as Sun god Surya), rides a chariot driven by four horses, and appears to be trampling a demon-like figure.
Photos courtesy of & taken by Himanshu Sarpotdar. The write-up of the site done by the Archaeological Survey of India was of great reference to me when writing this post.
ancientart:

The Bhaja Caves of Maharashtra, India.
Bhaja contains about 29 rock-cut caves, which date back to the 2nd century BCE, and is described by the Archaeological Survey of India to be “one of the important Buddhist centres of Hinayana faith in Maharashtra.” 
A prominent features of Bhaja is Cave 12, a chaitya-griha, pictured in the final photo, which is considered one of the earliest of its kind. The stupa at the back of the large apsidal hall was used for worship. Cave 20 contains a group of stupas, which were built in memory of deceased monks, and probably once contained their relics.
Cave 18 was a monastery, and its verandah contains two famous sculpted reliefs. One of these (pictured in the 2nd photo) is located to the left of the door. This artwork depicts a person riding an elephant (thought by some to be Indra) who carries an ankusa (elephant goad), with attendants aside the figure, carrying a banner. The second relief shows a royal personage aside two women. The royal figure (who some identify as Sun god Surya), rides a chariot driven by four horses, and appears to be trampling a demon-like figure.
Photos courtesy of & taken by Himanshu Sarpotdar. The write-up of the site done by the Archaeological Survey of India was of great reference to me when writing this post.
ancientart:

The Bhaja Caves of Maharashtra, India.
Bhaja contains about 29 rock-cut caves, which date back to the 2nd century BCE, and is described by the Archaeological Survey of India to be “one of the important Buddhist centres of Hinayana faith in Maharashtra.” 
A prominent features of Bhaja is Cave 12, a chaitya-griha, pictured in the final photo, which is considered one of the earliest of its kind. The stupa at the back of the large apsidal hall was used for worship. Cave 20 contains a group of stupas, which were built in memory of deceased monks, and probably once contained their relics.
Cave 18 was a monastery, and its verandah contains two famous sculpted reliefs. One of these (pictured in the 2nd photo) is located to the left of the door. This artwork depicts a person riding an elephant (thought by some to be Indra) who carries an ankusa (elephant goad), with attendants aside the figure, carrying a banner. The second relief shows a royal personage aside two women. The royal figure (who some identify as Sun god Surya), rides a chariot driven by four horses, and appears to be trampling a demon-like figure.
Photos courtesy of & taken by Himanshu Sarpotdar. The write-up of the site done by the Archaeological Survey of India was of great reference to me when writing this post.
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thedogobeys:

Torino - Giugno 2014
Claudio Cerasoli
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uglybelgianhouses:

But what does it mean?
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thewomb:

Hiro Noguchi
thewomb:

Hiro Noguchi
thewomb:

Hiro Noguchi
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micasaessucasa:

Source