nicco's diary
衣, 食, 住 In No Particular Order
nicco's diary
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danielle080881:








I’m sad Roger lost but you’re the besr forever
I will be in Geneva on Friday to to encourage you and dream team
danielle080881:








I’m sad Roger lost but you’re the besr forever
I will be in Geneva on Friday to to encourage you and dream team
danielle080881:








I’m sad Roger lost but you’re the besr forever
I will be in Geneva on Friday to to encourage you and dream team
danielle080881:








I’m sad Roger lost but you’re the besr forever
I will be in Geneva on Friday to to encourage you and dream team
danielle080881:








I’m sad Roger lost but you’re the besr forever
I will be in Geneva on Friday to to encourage you and dream team
danielle080881:








I’m sad Roger lost but you’re the besr forever
I will be in Geneva on Friday to to encourage you and dream team
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dynamicafrica:

Revisiting the “African-Urban-Man” Style: Sapeurs by Amira Ali.
“White people invented the clothes, but we make an art of it”, a phrase commonly used and referred to the Sapeurs, Congo-Brazzaville’s self-confessed modern day dandies. The phrase coined by Sapeur godfather Papa Wemba. 
Sapeurs, French slang for “dressing with class” take their name from the acronym SAPE, for Société des Ambianceurs et des Personnes Élégantes. Gentlemen’s club for the dapper, it’s a sartorial subculture consciously emulating its colonizer, layered with ambience and new expressions. The Sapes profess “La Sape” is an “art for ‘real’ gentlemen”. Living by an agreed aesthetical rule, their savior faire and modish use of the body and expensive dress with meticulously matched colors is a radical yet subtle form of protest, which in recent years has received international attention. Seemingly, the symbol of the Sapeur par excellence receives more notice on its aesthetics and less on meaning.
 In this extravagance buzz, the Sape’s fashion statement and bold flair is producing a post-modern phenomenon of the “African-urban-man” style and elegance. Sapologists, “gentlemen who live by a creed with a strict code of honor and morality”, are said to contest circumstances poised through the beautification effect of chic dressing. A belief that “it’s not the cost of the suit that counts, it’s the worth of the man inside it.” A performance and embodiment of sophistication, Sapeurs are prototypes of vibrant icons consciously portraying the embracing of a subcultural lifestyle. 
Fascinated by this culture, the western world, beyond its ahistorical representation of Africa, has taken on the Sape as its new ‘western’ media phenomenon. In 2011, though an oddly placed feature the Sapeurs stole the spotlight in Solange Knowles’ “Losing You” video, shot in South Africa. But discovered long before Solange’s video, they have been introduced to the world colorfully as a ‘society of tastemakers and fashionably elegant’ stylistic inspiration to photographers. 
The latest is the Guinness advertisement campaign; a break from the prototypical brand marketer’s portrayal of Africa, its approach takes on the exposé of the urban-debonair-man. A post-modern embodiment of style and sophistication, and a commitment to the “Society of Elegant Persons of the Congo” (La Sape), yet again, they add style, charm and vividness to a campaign that would otherwise be ordinary. These gentlemen referred to by Stephen O’Kelly, Guinness’ marketing director for Western Europe, as a “truly inspiring and unique group of men” are the featured ‘stars’ of Guinness’ recent advertising campaign, “Made of More”.  
A fashionable depiction, the Guinness ad artistically captures the extravagance of the everyday working Sapeurs as they transform from their day job to a cigar wielding, European-three-piece suit, silk socks, and fedora wearing men. Aesthically well crafted, a fine image is displayed of the urban-elegant expensive-looking of gentlemen. Yet, on the far side of this captivating documentation and splendid dress there is another side to the story of the Sapeurs living in Bakongo. These men are described as not being economically wealthy, and in fact some are said to rent items of clothing in the name of ‘ambianceur’ and fashion ‘worshipping’ or even take small fee(s) in exchange for a photographer’s glory –a snapshot of their dapper image. So, besides the undoubtedly rich spirit it may be a wonder, “what of what of the image we see of the Sapeurs is ‘true to life’?” A contrast of their ‘real-life’ far removed from our sight, the world is nonetheless left to experience the Sapeurs through the lens of photographers and cinematographers who bring out their mode par excellence alive. And perhaps, such depictions can be representational of the (re) construction attached to African cultural movements that permeates the western mainstream landscape.  
 All photos by Ruddy Roye :: a Brooklyn (New York) based photographer specializing in editorial and environmental portraits, and photojournalism. You can find more of his work here
dynamicafrica:

Revisiting the “African-Urban-Man” Style: Sapeurs by Amira Ali.
“White people invented the clothes, but we make an art of it”, a phrase commonly used and referred to the Sapeurs, Congo-Brazzaville’s self-confessed modern day dandies. The phrase coined by Sapeur godfather Papa Wemba. 
Sapeurs, French slang for “dressing with class” take their name from the acronym SAPE, for Société des Ambianceurs et des Personnes Élégantes. Gentlemen’s club for the dapper, it’s a sartorial subculture consciously emulating its colonizer, layered with ambience and new expressions. The Sapes profess “La Sape” is an “art for ‘real’ gentlemen”. Living by an agreed aesthetical rule, their savior faire and modish use of the body and expensive dress with meticulously matched colors is a radical yet subtle form of protest, which in recent years has received international attention. Seemingly, the symbol of the Sapeur par excellence receives more notice on its aesthetics and less on meaning.
 In this extravagance buzz, the Sape’s fashion statement and bold flair is producing a post-modern phenomenon of the “African-urban-man” style and elegance. Sapologists, “gentlemen who live by a creed with a strict code of honor and morality”, are said to contest circumstances poised through the beautification effect of chic dressing. A belief that “it’s not the cost of the suit that counts, it’s the worth of the man inside it.” A performance and embodiment of sophistication, Sapeurs are prototypes of vibrant icons consciously portraying the embracing of a subcultural lifestyle. 
Fascinated by this culture, the western world, beyond its ahistorical representation of Africa, has taken on the Sape as its new ‘western’ media phenomenon. In 2011, though an oddly placed feature the Sapeurs stole the spotlight in Solange Knowles’ “Losing You” video, shot in South Africa. But discovered long before Solange’s video, they have been introduced to the world colorfully as a ‘society of tastemakers and fashionably elegant’ stylistic inspiration to photographers. 
The latest is the Guinness advertisement campaign; a break from the prototypical brand marketer’s portrayal of Africa, its approach takes on the exposé of the urban-debonair-man. A post-modern embodiment of style and sophistication, and a commitment to the “Society of Elegant Persons of the Congo” (La Sape), yet again, they add style, charm and vividness to a campaign that would otherwise be ordinary. These gentlemen referred to by Stephen O’Kelly, Guinness’ marketing director for Western Europe, as a “truly inspiring and unique group of men” are the featured ‘stars’ of Guinness’ recent advertising campaign, “Made of More”.  
A fashionable depiction, the Guinness ad artistically captures the extravagance of the everyday working Sapeurs as they transform from their day job to a cigar wielding, European-three-piece suit, silk socks, and fedora wearing men. Aesthically well crafted, a fine image is displayed of the urban-elegant expensive-looking of gentlemen. Yet, on the far side of this captivating documentation and splendid dress there is another side to the story of the Sapeurs living in Bakongo. These men are described as not being economically wealthy, and in fact some are said to rent items of clothing in the name of ‘ambianceur’ and fashion ‘worshipping’ or even take small fee(s) in exchange for a photographer’s glory –a snapshot of their dapper image. So, besides the undoubtedly rich spirit it may be a wonder, “what of what of the image we see of the Sapeurs is ‘true to life’?” A contrast of their ‘real-life’ far removed from our sight, the world is nonetheless left to experience the Sapeurs through the lens of photographers and cinematographers who bring out their mode par excellence alive. And perhaps, such depictions can be representational of the (re) construction attached to African cultural movements that permeates the western mainstream landscape.  
 All photos by Ruddy Roye :: a Brooklyn (New York) based photographer specializing in editorial and environmental portraits, and photojournalism. You can find more of his work here
dynamicafrica:

Revisiting the “African-Urban-Man” Style: Sapeurs by Amira Ali.
“White people invented the clothes, but we make an art of it”, a phrase commonly used and referred to the Sapeurs, Congo-Brazzaville’s self-confessed modern day dandies. The phrase coined by Sapeur godfather Papa Wemba. 
Sapeurs, French slang for “dressing with class” take their name from the acronym SAPE, for Société des Ambianceurs et des Personnes Élégantes. Gentlemen’s club for the dapper, it’s a sartorial subculture consciously emulating its colonizer, layered with ambience and new expressions. The Sapes profess “La Sape” is an “art for ‘real’ gentlemen”. Living by an agreed aesthetical rule, their savior faire and modish use of the body and expensive dress with meticulously matched colors is a radical yet subtle form of protest, which in recent years has received international attention. Seemingly, the symbol of the Sapeur par excellence receives more notice on its aesthetics and less on meaning.
 In this extravagance buzz, the Sape’s fashion statement and bold flair is producing a post-modern phenomenon of the “African-urban-man” style and elegance. Sapologists, “gentlemen who live by a creed with a strict code of honor and morality”, are said to contest circumstances poised through the beautification effect of chic dressing. A belief that “it’s not the cost of the suit that counts, it’s the worth of the man inside it.” A performance and embodiment of sophistication, Sapeurs are prototypes of vibrant icons consciously portraying the embracing of a subcultural lifestyle. 
Fascinated by this culture, the western world, beyond its ahistorical representation of Africa, has taken on the Sape as its new ‘western’ media phenomenon. In 2011, though an oddly placed feature the Sapeurs stole the spotlight in Solange Knowles’ “Losing You” video, shot in South Africa. But discovered long before Solange’s video, they have been introduced to the world colorfully as a ‘society of tastemakers and fashionably elegant’ stylistic inspiration to photographers. 
The latest is the Guinness advertisement campaign; a break from the prototypical brand marketer’s portrayal of Africa, its approach takes on the exposé of the urban-debonair-man. A post-modern embodiment of style and sophistication, and a commitment to the “Society of Elegant Persons of the Congo” (La Sape), yet again, they add style, charm and vividness to a campaign that would otherwise be ordinary. These gentlemen referred to by Stephen O’Kelly, Guinness’ marketing director for Western Europe, as a “truly inspiring and unique group of men” are the featured ‘stars’ of Guinness’ recent advertising campaign, “Made of More”.  
A fashionable depiction, the Guinness ad artistically captures the extravagance of the everyday working Sapeurs as they transform from their day job to a cigar wielding, European-three-piece suit, silk socks, and fedora wearing men. Aesthically well crafted, a fine image is displayed of the urban-elegant expensive-looking of gentlemen. Yet, on the far side of this captivating documentation and splendid dress there is another side to the story of the Sapeurs living in Bakongo. These men are described as not being economically wealthy, and in fact some are said to rent items of clothing in the name of ‘ambianceur’ and fashion ‘worshipping’ or even take small fee(s) in exchange for a photographer’s glory –a snapshot of their dapper image. So, besides the undoubtedly rich spirit it may be a wonder, “what of what of the image we see of the Sapeurs is ‘true to life’?” A contrast of their ‘real-life’ far removed from our sight, the world is nonetheless left to experience the Sapeurs through the lens of photographers and cinematographers who bring out their mode par excellence alive. And perhaps, such depictions can be representational of the (re) construction attached to African cultural movements that permeates the western mainstream landscape.  
 All photos by Ruddy Roye :: a Brooklyn (New York) based photographer specializing in editorial and environmental portraits, and photojournalism. You can find more of his work here
dynamicafrica:

Revisiting the “African-Urban-Man” Style: Sapeurs by Amira Ali.
“White people invented the clothes, but we make an art of it”, a phrase commonly used and referred to the Sapeurs, Congo-Brazzaville’s self-confessed modern day dandies. The phrase coined by Sapeur godfather Papa Wemba. 
Sapeurs, French slang for “dressing with class” take their name from the acronym SAPE, for Société des Ambianceurs et des Personnes Élégantes. Gentlemen’s club for the dapper, it’s a sartorial subculture consciously emulating its colonizer, layered with ambience and new expressions. The Sapes profess “La Sape” is an “art for ‘real’ gentlemen”. Living by an agreed aesthetical rule, their savior faire and modish use of the body and expensive dress with meticulously matched colors is a radical yet subtle form of protest, which in recent years has received international attention. Seemingly, the symbol of the Sapeur par excellence receives more notice on its aesthetics and less on meaning.
 In this extravagance buzz, the Sape’s fashion statement and bold flair is producing a post-modern phenomenon of the “African-urban-man” style and elegance. Sapologists, “gentlemen who live by a creed with a strict code of honor and morality”, are said to contest circumstances poised through the beautification effect of chic dressing. A belief that “it’s not the cost of the suit that counts, it’s the worth of the man inside it.” A performance and embodiment of sophistication, Sapeurs are prototypes of vibrant icons consciously portraying the embracing of a subcultural lifestyle. 
Fascinated by this culture, the western world, beyond its ahistorical representation of Africa, has taken on the Sape as its new ‘western’ media phenomenon. In 2011, though an oddly placed feature the Sapeurs stole the spotlight in Solange Knowles’ “Losing You” video, shot in South Africa. But discovered long before Solange’s video, they have been introduced to the world colorfully as a ‘society of tastemakers and fashionably elegant’ stylistic inspiration to photographers. 
The latest is the Guinness advertisement campaign; a break from the prototypical brand marketer’s portrayal of Africa, its approach takes on the exposé of the urban-debonair-man. A post-modern embodiment of style and sophistication, and a commitment to the “Society of Elegant Persons of the Congo” (La Sape), yet again, they add style, charm and vividness to a campaign that would otherwise be ordinary. These gentlemen referred to by Stephen O’Kelly, Guinness’ marketing director for Western Europe, as a “truly inspiring and unique group of men” are the featured ‘stars’ of Guinness’ recent advertising campaign, “Made of More”.  
A fashionable depiction, the Guinness ad artistically captures the extravagance of the everyday working Sapeurs as they transform from their day job to a cigar wielding, European-three-piece suit, silk socks, and fedora wearing men. Aesthically well crafted, a fine image is displayed of the urban-elegant expensive-looking of gentlemen. Yet, on the far side of this captivating documentation and splendid dress there is another side to the story of the Sapeurs living in Bakongo. These men are described as not being economically wealthy, and in fact some are said to rent items of clothing in the name of ‘ambianceur’ and fashion ‘worshipping’ or even take small fee(s) in exchange for a photographer’s glory –a snapshot of their dapper image. So, besides the undoubtedly rich spirit it may be a wonder, “what of what of the image we see of the Sapeurs is ‘true to life’?” A contrast of their ‘real-life’ far removed from our sight, the world is nonetheless left to experience the Sapeurs through the lens of photographers and cinematographers who bring out their mode par excellence alive. And perhaps, such depictions can be representational of the (re) construction attached to African cultural movements that permeates the western mainstream landscape.  
 All photos by Ruddy Roye :: a Brooklyn (New York) based photographer specializing in editorial and environmental portraits, and photojournalism. You can find more of his work here
dynamicafrica:

Revisiting the “African-Urban-Man” Style: Sapeurs by Amira Ali.
“White people invented the clothes, but we make an art of it”, a phrase commonly used and referred to the Sapeurs, Congo-Brazzaville’s self-confessed modern day dandies. The phrase coined by Sapeur godfather Papa Wemba. 
Sapeurs, French slang for “dressing with class” take their name from the acronym SAPE, for Société des Ambianceurs et des Personnes Élégantes. Gentlemen’s club for the dapper, it’s a sartorial subculture consciously emulating its colonizer, layered with ambience and new expressions. The Sapes profess “La Sape” is an “art for ‘real’ gentlemen”. Living by an agreed aesthetical rule, their savior faire and modish use of the body and expensive dress with meticulously matched colors is a radical yet subtle form of protest, which in recent years has received international attention. Seemingly, the symbol of the Sapeur par excellence receives more notice on its aesthetics and less on meaning.
 In this extravagance buzz, the Sape’s fashion statement and bold flair is producing a post-modern phenomenon of the “African-urban-man” style and elegance. Sapologists, “gentlemen who live by a creed with a strict code of honor and morality”, are said to contest circumstances poised through the beautification effect of chic dressing. A belief that “it’s not the cost of the suit that counts, it’s the worth of the man inside it.” A performance and embodiment of sophistication, Sapeurs are prototypes of vibrant icons consciously portraying the embracing of a subcultural lifestyle. 
Fascinated by this culture, the western world, beyond its ahistorical representation of Africa, has taken on the Sape as its new ‘western’ media phenomenon. In 2011, though an oddly placed feature the Sapeurs stole the spotlight in Solange Knowles’ “Losing You” video, shot in South Africa. But discovered long before Solange’s video, they have been introduced to the world colorfully as a ‘society of tastemakers and fashionably elegant’ stylistic inspiration to photographers. 
The latest is the Guinness advertisement campaign; a break from the prototypical brand marketer’s portrayal of Africa, its approach takes on the exposé of the urban-debonair-man. A post-modern embodiment of style and sophistication, and a commitment to the “Society of Elegant Persons of the Congo” (La Sape), yet again, they add style, charm and vividness to a campaign that would otherwise be ordinary. These gentlemen referred to by Stephen O’Kelly, Guinness’ marketing director for Western Europe, as a “truly inspiring and unique group of men” are the featured ‘stars’ of Guinness’ recent advertising campaign, “Made of More”.  
A fashionable depiction, the Guinness ad artistically captures the extravagance of the everyday working Sapeurs as they transform from their day job to a cigar wielding, European-three-piece suit, silk socks, and fedora wearing men. Aesthically well crafted, a fine image is displayed of the urban-elegant expensive-looking of gentlemen. Yet, on the far side of this captivating documentation and splendid dress there is another side to the story of the Sapeurs living in Bakongo. These men are described as not being economically wealthy, and in fact some are said to rent items of clothing in the name of ‘ambianceur’ and fashion ‘worshipping’ or even take small fee(s) in exchange for a photographer’s glory –a snapshot of their dapper image. So, besides the undoubtedly rich spirit it may be a wonder, “what of what of the image we see of the Sapeurs is ‘true to life’?” A contrast of their ‘real-life’ far removed from our sight, the world is nonetheless left to experience the Sapeurs through the lens of photographers and cinematographers who bring out their mode par excellence alive. And perhaps, such depictions can be representational of the (re) construction attached to African cultural movements that permeates the western mainstream landscape.  
 All photos by Ruddy Roye :: a Brooklyn (New York) based photographer specializing in editorial and environmental portraits, and photojournalism. You can find more of his work here
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mpdrolet:

Mitsuko Nagone
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type-lover:

Stampsby Tobias Ohlström
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poochin:

Daily Picdump #1185
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thedsgnblog:

Tung    |    http://madebytung.com
"Ryuji Mitani is a renowned contemporary woodworker from Japan. His wood tableware has been exhibited in countless galleries and museums all over Japan and abroad. His solo exhibition at Toronto design shop Mjölk, was his first North American exhibition. The mini brochure designed for the exhibition unfolds, doubling as a commemorative poster."
Tung is a Toronto-based studio specializing in graphic design and art direction within the fields of art, culture and commerce. Founded in 2014 by Emily Tu and Edmond Ng, their practice developed out of a shared desire to create honest, intelligent and beautifully crafted work. They take a grounded and considered approach to design. Their process is decidedly personal – they collaborate with their clients to create thoughtful and compelling responses that reflect their needs and values.
The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
thedsgnblog:

Tung    |    http://madebytung.com
"Ryuji Mitani is a renowned contemporary woodworker from Japan. His wood tableware has been exhibited in countless galleries and museums all over Japan and abroad. His solo exhibition at Toronto design shop Mjölk, was his first North American exhibition. The mini brochure designed for the exhibition unfolds, doubling as a commemorative poster."
Tung is a Toronto-based studio specializing in graphic design and art direction within the fields of art, culture and commerce. Founded in 2014 by Emily Tu and Edmond Ng, their practice developed out of a shared desire to create honest, intelligent and beautifully crafted work. They take a grounded and considered approach to design. Their process is decidedly personal – they collaborate with their clients to create thoughtful and compelling responses that reflect their needs and values.
The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
thedsgnblog:

Tung    |    http://madebytung.com
"Ryuji Mitani is a renowned contemporary woodworker from Japan. His wood tableware has been exhibited in countless galleries and museums all over Japan and abroad. His solo exhibition at Toronto design shop Mjölk, was his first North American exhibition. The mini brochure designed for the exhibition unfolds, doubling as a commemorative poster."
Tung is a Toronto-based studio specializing in graphic design and art direction within the fields of art, culture and commerce. Founded in 2014 by Emily Tu and Edmond Ng, their practice developed out of a shared desire to create honest, intelligent and beautifully crafted work. They take a grounded and considered approach to design. Their process is decidedly personal – they collaborate with their clients to create thoughtful and compelling responses that reflect their needs and values.
The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
thedsgnblog:

Tung    |    http://madebytung.com
"Ryuji Mitani is a renowned contemporary woodworker from Japan. His wood tableware has been exhibited in countless galleries and museums all over Japan and abroad. His solo exhibition at Toronto design shop Mjölk, was his first North American exhibition. The mini brochure designed for the exhibition unfolds, doubling as a commemorative poster."
Tung is a Toronto-based studio specializing in graphic design and art direction within the fields of art, culture and commerce. Founded in 2014 by Emily Tu and Edmond Ng, their practice developed out of a shared desire to create honest, intelligent and beautifully crafted work. They take a grounded and considered approach to design. Their process is decidedly personal – they collaborate with their clients to create thoughtful and compelling responses that reflect their needs and values.
The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
thedsgnblog:

Tung    |    http://madebytung.com
"Ryuji Mitani is a renowned contemporary woodworker from Japan. His wood tableware has been exhibited in countless galleries and museums all over Japan and abroad. His solo exhibition at Toronto design shop Mjölk, was his first North American exhibition. The mini brochure designed for the exhibition unfolds, doubling as a commemorative poster."
Tung is a Toronto-based studio specializing in graphic design and art direction within the fields of art, culture and commerce. Founded in 2014 by Emily Tu and Edmond Ng, their practice developed out of a shared desire to create honest, intelligent and beautifully crafted work. They take a grounded and considered approach to design. Their process is decidedly personal – they collaborate with their clients to create thoughtful and compelling responses that reflect their needs and values.
The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
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darksilenceinsuburbia:

Helene Veilleux
38e paralléle nord
Candid report of North Korea, photographic dissection of the urban environment, uncanny portraiture … my camera is my preferred tool to explore my inner world and the big one around me.
Website
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Helene Veilleux
38e paralléle nord
Candid report of North Korea, photographic dissection of the urban environment, uncanny portraiture … my camera is my preferred tool to explore my inner world and the big one around me.
Website
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Helene Veilleux
38e paralléle nord
Candid report of North Korea, photographic dissection of the urban environment, uncanny portraiture … my camera is my preferred tool to explore my inner world and the big one around me.
Website
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Helene Veilleux
38e paralléle nord
Candid report of North Korea, photographic dissection of the urban environment, uncanny portraiture … my camera is my preferred tool to explore my inner world and the big one around me.
Website
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Helene Veilleux
38e paralléle nord
Candid report of North Korea, photographic dissection of the urban environment, uncanny portraiture … my camera is my preferred tool to explore my inner world and the big one around me.
Website
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Helene Veilleux
38e paralléle nord
Candid report of North Korea, photographic dissection of the urban environment, uncanny portraiture … my camera is my preferred tool to explore my inner world and the big one around me.
Website
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Helene Veilleux
38e paralléle nord
Candid report of North Korea, photographic dissection of the urban environment, uncanny portraiture … my camera is my preferred tool to explore my inner world and the big one around me.
Website
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subtilitas:

Livio Vacchini - Power plant, Giubiasco 2010. Perhaps a nod to the 1964 Swiss Expo. Photos (C) Marco Introini. 
subtilitas:

Livio Vacchini - Power plant, Giubiasco 2010. Perhaps a nod to the 1964 Swiss Expo. Photos (C) Marco Introini. 
subtilitas:

Livio Vacchini - Power plant, Giubiasco 2010. Perhaps a nod to the 1964 Swiss Expo. Photos (C) Marco Introini. 
subtilitas:

Livio Vacchini - Power plant, Giubiasco 2010. Perhaps a nod to the 1964 Swiss Expo. Photos (C) Marco Introini. 
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megazal:

P021809PS-0069 by The White House on Flickr.
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sizvideos:

Video
sizvideos:

Video
sizvideos:

Video
sizvideos:

Video
sizvideos:

Video
sizvideos:

Video
sizvideos:

Video
sizvideos:

Video
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enochliew:

Oliver Ranch Installation by Bruce Nauman
All the treads are exactly the same size, but every riser is different and measures the changing contours every 30 inches.
enochliew:

Oliver Ranch Installation by Bruce Nauman
All the treads are exactly the same size, but every riser is different and measures the changing contours every 30 inches.
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megazal:

All sizes | . | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
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bigmagnets:

the rodina